SB 569 – relative to animal cruelty killed

After three meetings in three days, the conference committee, consisting of three senators and four representatives, was unable to reach an agreement and SB 569 – relative to animal cruelty will not become law.

First, a big thank you to everyone who came to Concord to testify or just sign in opposed to the senate version of SB 569 as well as those who wrote and called about the bill.  You did a wonderful job explaining the concerns of people who raise dogs as an avocation, not as a commercial enterprise.

The House Environment and Agriculture Committee spent long hours working on the bill and their efforts produced a bill we could support. The House version a clear and easily enforceable definition of who should hold a state license as a commercial breeder – recognizing the difference between private citizens who own dogs and participate in the many wonderful dog activities held in our State, and commercial kennels whose primary focus is breeding animals for sale. (more…)

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SB 569 – One Hurdle Gone

Good news! After devoting long hours last week to preparing an amendment,  on April 24th, in a bipartisan vote, the House Environment and Agriculture Committee, voted SB 569 – relative to animal cruelty and establishing a commission to study certain language applicable to the transfer of animals. Ought to Pass as Amended.  The committee has addressed many of our concerns that they heard in the testimony at the hearings.

You can read the bipartisan amendment here.

Some of the changes include: (more…)

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April 11 – Continued Hearing on SB569

The House Environment and Agriculture Committee will continue the hearing on SB 569 –  relative to animal cruelty and establishing a commission to study certain language applicable to the transfer of animals on   04/11/2018 at 9:00 AM    Legislative Office Building Room 201-203. 

Please try and attend. Even if you can’t stay for the whole hearing, you can still sign in as opposed.

Report on the April 4th hearing –

The hearing on the 4th went from 10 am until 3 with a break for lunch.  Many thanks to all the dog breeders and owners who came into testify against the bill.  They did a great job of bringing up their concerns with the bill. The NH Farm Bureau testified against SB569 while the the NH Veterinary Medical Association said: “While Senate Bill 569 is well intentioned, its new regulations won’t protect animals from harm and doesn’t stop people from hoarding pets. Expanding the definition of commercial breeder and mandating more inspections of pet vendors by the Department of Agriculture will not stop individuals who are already breaking existing statues,” http://nhpr.org/post/concerns-raised-over-dog-breeding-bill-drafted-after-wolfeboro-animal-cruelty-case

(more…)

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April 4th hearing for SB569

The House Environment and Agriculture Committee will hold it hearing on SB 569 –  relative to animal cruelty and establishing a commission to study certain language applicable to the transfer of animals on   04/04/2018 at 10:00 AM    Legislative Office Building Room 301-303. 

Please try and attend. Even if you can’t stay for the whole hearing, you can still sign in as opposed.

 

D.O.G.S. is opposed to SB 569 for the following reasons:

  • This bill requires someone who owns 7 or more “Breeding Females” over the age of 2 to be licensed as a commercial kennel. Additionally, it says that any unspayed female who has had a litter shall be counted as a “Breeding Female” forever even if the owner has no plans ever to breed her again.
  • The requirement to license as a commercial kennel is not based on any sales of dogs or puppies having taken place Other New England states require the sale of animals as a necessary part of a commercial license.
  • Although the bill states that ” The term “commercial” shall not be taken into consideration for any zoning purposes.” This statement in the bill does not guarantee that the towns will treat a hobby breeder as non-commercial. Many N.H. towns have zoning requirements for “Kennels” and owners required to be licensed as a “Commercial Kennel” will be affected by these zoning requirements and may be forced to move or get rid of their dogs.
  • If multiple numbers of animals, particularly large animals such as dogs and horses are confiscated, the actual cost of care will be substantial. People, who cannot afford to post a bond will lose their animals before the criminal case is concluded – even if found innocent.
  • Although a homeowner who owns dogs may not sell dogs to the public, the owner’s home  still would be required to be open to anyone to inspect that owner’s records. This bill is an invasion of privacy.
  • The person who has had their animals confiscated would need to defend two different court cases; a criminal case for the cruelty charges and the cost of care bonding case incurring additional attorneys fees.  An owner could lose the bonding case and still be found NOT guilty in the criminal case.
  • Inadequately trained enforcement officials can easily mistake and have in the past an ill animal that is under veterinary care as a cruelty situation and mistakenly confiscate them forcing the owner to defend themselves in two trials while leaving the animal untreated.

(more…)

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Oppose NH Senate Bill 569 flier

 

While we wait for the House hearing on SB569, there is something you can do.  Print up some of these Oppose NH Senate Bill 569  fliers and pass them out to your friends, post them in feed stores, at your vets, at pet day care facilities and training facilities or anyplace where they are likely to be seen by pet owners and breeders.  Just make sure to get the owner’s permission first.

High quality copies are available for download at these links: 

(pdf) https://www.dropbox.com/s/ixwx9toz7btduul/SenateBillFlyer_NH..pdf?dl=0

(jgp) https://www.dropbox.com/s/xi434ps1r0wg6iq/SenateBillFlyer_NH.jpg?dl=0

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